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Posts Tagged ‘College Life’

Back By Popular Demand, Anny Jacoby and Crime Time with Vito Colucci, Part 2

September 9, 2011 Comments off

Sunday Night, September 11, 11pm ET

on Business Talk Radio

Listen LIVE: http://businesstalkradio.net/weekend_host/ctvc.shtml

Back for another run!  Vito Colucci invites Anny Jacoby back to the show to continue the conversation.  On this show they will discuss the importance of college campus safety, street smarts, carjacking and safety, stranger asking for directions, and knowing your surroundings.  Everyone will want to listen to the information on this show to know how to stay safe in a dangerous world!

Crime Time with Vito Colucci, P.I.  features anything crime related. Current high profile cases or trials are discussed in detail with commentary from experts in law  enforcement, investigators and lawyers.

Vito Colucci, Jr.

Vito Colucci, Jr., owner of Colucci Investigations LLC, is a former member of the Stamford, CT Police Department where he worked as a Narcotic’s Detective and Undercover Organized Crime Investigator. One of the main investigations Vito spearheaded during that time was uncovering the organized crime ties within his own police department.

Vito has been a private investigator for the past 22 years, working many high profile cases; Michael Skakel/Martha Moxley case, Jayson William’s case, and honeymooner, George Smith’s case .

Vito Colucci is a regular commentator on various news programs including: Fox News MSNBC, Catherine Crier/Court TV, Star Jones, Glenn Beck, Nancy Grace, Larry King, CNN Headline News, and The Bill O’Reilly Show, as well as being a featured speaker at the first World Investigator’s Conference in LasVegas in 2005.

Anny’s mission is to reach out to every avenue available to teach these skills at the corporate level, to emergency services, victim support groups and agencies, schools, colleges and health service providers.  Her professional programs are designed for every age group from children to seniors, as well as a program designed specifically for the disabled.

Recently, Anny has developed a new division to her company, Project Safe Girls, which is designed specifically for girls and is used in after school programs, girl’s organizations and YWCAs, to name a few of the target areas.  Specific curriculum and training is developed for age appropriate

Anny’s program is not traditional “self-defense” nor martial arts or weapons.  She has developed her training specifically for females and teaches them to use their bodies as their weapon to diffuse a violent situation.

Anny’s style is serious, with compassion and empathy, yet fun and empowering. Her training classes and seminars leave her students with a sense of confidence and an understanding of their intuitions regarding safety. Anny has authored a comprehensive training manual for each student to take with them as reference.

Anny Jacoby is available for speaking engagements, lectures, individual consultations and presentations. She is a Certified PDR (Personal Defense Readiness) Instructor and has a team of male Certified PDR instructors and coaches with The Realistic Female Self-Defense Company who are dedicated to teaching and training only females.

Anny is also an independent contractor as a Certified Prevention Specialist and an Authorized Stewards of Children Facilitator through the Darkness to Light prevention program.  She has developed a passion for educating parents and communities about the issue of child sexual abuse and prevention. She is available to travel throughout the US bringing this important and vital information to all.

For media appearances and inquires or speaking engagements please contact: ImaginePublicity, contact@imaginepublicity.com; 843-808-0859

 

Release produced by ImaginePublicity

Annie Le’s death at Yale puts spotlight on campus security…

August 21, 2011 1 comment

Video surveillance cameras, live cameras monitored 24/7 and official warnings that can be blasted in seconds to tens of thousands via email, cell phone text messages and Facebook. Campus security is more sophisticated than ever, but college officials say they still can’t absolutely guarantee the safety of their students.

“That is impossible,” says Melissa Essary, dean of the Campbell Law School in Raleigh, NC. “There will always be criminals out there who can get away from the best security system.”

Since the Virginia Tech killings, schools around the country have beefed up security substantially, she says. Her school has just one public entrance, staffed full time by a security officer. But a potentially dangerous situation could erupt from within, she says.   “There are potential inside threats as well as outside threats,” Essary says.

Though many colleges have surveillance cameras, only some are live while others are recording devices that would only be examined after the fact, not when a crime is actually occurring.

Student security isn’t only the responsibility of the college, says John Carroll, head of safety and security for all three Fordham campuses. “It is a shared responsibility for the individual, for campus security,  and for the police department,” he says. “I’m sure I speak for my peers at other schools when I say that we will all take a strong look at the Yale incident just like we took a look at Virginia Tech to make sure we are doing everything humanly possible to protect our students.”

Fordham can text, voice and email all 15,000 students in seconds, he says, and a year and a half ago, when an emotionally disturbed person crashed through the gates, the college was able to warn everyone to stay away from the library, where the man, armed with a gun, was headed. “We contained the man and we were able to let everyone know,” Carroll says.

At Pratt Institute, security officers patrol the campus on foot, by car, and on bikes. There are hundreds of closed circuit TV cameras, emergency phones in campus buildings and outdoors, and a strictly enforced card-access only policy to the residence halls, according to William Schmitz, Pratt’s director of safety and security.

Many colleges are starting to use Facebook and Twitter to get out warnings to students, according to the Orlando Sentinel. Their goal is to use social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter to reach as many students as possible as quickly as possible, according to the Sentinel.   The sites offer yet another way to communicate news to students. University of Florida is testing an indoor speaker system that uses Voice Over Internet Protocol, according to the Sentinel, in which announcements can be heard in almost all classrooms.

Still, officials say, it’s impossible to say that a college will always be completely safe.

“A college or university campus is a microcosm of our society,” Schmitz says. “While campus safety and security departments are invested in and committed to safeguarding campuses and students to the fullest extent possible, unfortunately crimes may still may occur.”

The reality of one’s safety and protection ultimately lies within one’s self, never rely upon another individual, staff or a college for you or your daughter’s safety.

Our children/daughters often never learn “life skills” to get them through life.  “Life skills” must be taught to every female of every age.  It’s not being paranoid, it’s about being smart and having tools in your toolbox (mentally and physically) to rely upon.  Learning about awareness, gut instincts and the smell of potential danger can save one’s life.

PREVENTION IS THE ANSWER!

Take care and STAY SAFE!

Contributor in part: NYDailyNews

“It’s Time To Get Your Head Out Of The Sand…”

July 14, 2011 2 comments

Becoming educated makes a person more understanding, more aware and more comfortable with the truth.  I am personally becoming more and more appalled with parents that do exactly what is displayed in the picture above.  And, then I get phone calls and emails that their daughters have been assaulted and asked to help them through the system at the schools and law enforcement departments.  Makes me shake my head and ask………”Didn’t you even take the opportunity to check into the crimes stats BEFORE even visiting? Or, spend a some money on giving her the education and advantage of personal safety?”  The majority of the time is “NO”.

It is time for females AND parents to get their heads out of the sand, understand the myths (excuses) and learn the facts (reality) of “realisitic” personal safety training/self-defense and to become proactive. There is not one form of personal safety training/self-defense that is 100% guaranteed. Weapons of every kind are not a guarantee either (we’ll look at this too). However, with education at least you may be able to detect (awareness), learn the ability to de-escalate a potentially dangerous situation and ultimately if a physical altercation occurs you will be better equipped with the knowledge of “realistic” defense.

We all have excuses for things in our lives that we don’t do or spend too much time doing. These excuses serve as deterrents preventing us from following through with action and benefits. When you begin to understand or experience the consequences of your excuses you get a really good reality check. This reality check (wake-up call) usually changes your way of thinking automatically.

The “myth concept” not only affects many areas in our lives but also has the same influence in the personal safety training/self-defense world. These myths make females apprehensive toward or opposed to personal safety training/self-defense.

A myth can be and often is used as an excuse for not doing something. 

The attitude, “it won’t happen to me” is a huge myth; every female should look in the mirror and realize that victimization does not discriminate. This is just plain ignorance if you believe that the possibility that you cannot be a victim is true. You have to debunk the thought that learning personal safety training/self-defense carries negative characteristics (aggression, arrogance, or violence). And, by not understanding that if trained properly to obtain the mental and physical abilities that you can possibly prevent or de-escalate an attack is a total underestimation on your part.

When we begin to understand the facts=reality of these myths=excuses we begin to understand objectives, the effectiveness and the technique of personal safety training/self-defense. We can save our life or the life of someone we love. We can prevent ourselves from becoming a statistic of crime. As I stated above, personal safety training/self-defense is not a guaranteed free pass from crime; however, your chances of survival and the ability to detect a possible altercation are increased significantly.

Becoming educated your level of awareness increases or is heightened, your intuition (gut instincts) are better in tune and your physical abilities are sharpened so that your chances of being attacked, raped or murdered are statistically lessened. You won’t broadcast that you know “self-defense” but you won’t walk down a certain street or in an area when your instincts (gut) kicks in and tells you to turn back. When someone grabs you from behind you won’t freeze but immediately your reaction will be to fight back upon recognition of your window of opportunity. You will see that a seemingly hopeless and defenseless situation has more opportunities for defense than you could have ever imagined.

Personal safety training/self-defense is NOT about being paranoid, it IS about being smart!

Knowledge is a powerful tool.

Stop making excuses and do something powerful for yourself and your loved ones – obtain Personal Safety Training. Training (mind, body and soul) that you will have for the rest of your life.

How can any parent put a price tag on the life of their daughter?  Why wouldn’t you want your daughter in high school/middle school and especially college bound to be educated?

Question……beside looking at the pretty websites and visiting University after University…..has anyone truly looked in the stats of these schools as to their crime stats via The Jean Cleary Act or Title IX?  Parents…..do your homework.  In my book……………NO CAMPUS IS CRIME FREE AND THE NUMBER OF FEMALE STUDENTS BEING ASSAULTED (BY SOMEONE THEY KNOW OR RANDOM) IS OFF THE CHARTS.  Parents……give your daughter the tools for her tool belt, give her the opportunity that she will have for the rest of her life.  No parent wants to receive “that phone call”; trust me.  (*Again, no personal safety course is 100% guaranteed, but even if she gains 50% knowledge of what she never had to begin with isn’t that worth something?)  Think about…………long and hard.  Again, can you honestly put a price tag on your daughter’s life?  Most parents answer is “NO”.

How can any female NOT want to be proactive and at least have the knowledge of COULD happen if I don’t know personal safety?  Personal safety is so much more than watching a DVD in your livingroom – it is truly about education and ultimately physically how to protect oneself.  Girls talk to your parents……this is an exciting time but you guys have to know the possibilities and reality.  Not to “scare” you but you have to know the odds and know how to handle situations.

Parents – get involved in your daughter’s safety during college.  Parents or Gals……contact me for details as we are gearing up our tour to bring personal safety training (6 hours on one weekend day) to communities everywhere! Organizers of training’s will train for FREE!

Take care and STAY SAFE!

UVA Violated The Jeanne Clery Act AND Failed To Report Another Sex Crime

October 6, 2010 1 comment

UVA Violated The Jeanne Clery Act AND Failed To Report Another Sex Crime

Charlottesville, VA– Late Tuesday evening, prompted by questions by the Editor In Chief of blinkoncrime.com about a recent rape which occurred at the DZ sorority on Chancellor Street, The University of Virginia sent out an alert to students.

However, as required of UVA by the Clery Act, the alert was 10 days late. Charlottesville Police recorded a police report of a forcible rape on September 17, 2010.

The Jeanne Clery Act, founded by her parents, Howard and Connie Clery, is a Federal Law applicable to all Higher Learning Institutions that participate in Federal funding assistance which requires mandatory reporting for specified crimes.

Constance and Howard Clery founders of Security ON Campus, Inc. after their 19 year old daughter Jeanne was brutally raped, tortured and murdered while sleeping in her dorm on April 5, 1986.

Fellow Lehigh University co-eds propped 3 different doors open, in violation of security rules, unknowingly allowing her killer access.

The bill which became a Federal law, was based on the fact that 38 different violent offenses occurred at Lehigh U that the student body was never made aware of prior to Clery’s murder. Had they been, it is almost certain not only would the automatic locking doors have been inaccessible, but parents and students combined would have demanded security upgrades to prevent such a heinous event.

Following the email that went to 23,000 students at 11:01 PM September 28, Allen Groves, Dean of Students, and Lt. Melissa Fielding of the University Police Department, held an impromptu press conference Wednesday, as a follow up to the email alert with some additional background information.

UVA STUDENT ATTACKS SEPTEMBER 2010 PART 1

UVA STUDENT ATTACKS SEPTEMBER 2010 PART 2

Time line Breakdown

9–17 1:15am UVA student attacked from behind, raped and beaten on Delta Zeta House, Chancellor Street.

9-17 Noon- Email Equivalent to “Whisper Down the Rotunda” Begins:

Received a third party email, NOT from the victim, indicating a stranger attack had occurred to a sister, as previously reported at blinkoncrime.com, at DZ House on Chancellor St.  We forwarded that on to our endless list of associate deans. They called the Sorority president for more  information so that we might begin “acting upon it”.

9–18 Additional Sexual Assault Occurs At Fraternity on Madison Lane 3AM

*Unreported To Students To Date*

9–18 A Robbery Occurs During the Course of Above, Same Frat 3AM

*Unreported To Students To Date*

9–19 A Breaking And Entering Occurs, Undisclosed Sorority House, Chancellor St

*Unreported To Students To Date*

9-20 Associate Dean reaches out directly to the victim to ..”get the details of the attack and also to assist the student. No contact made with victim.

9–20 Associate Deans Office receives call from a female student’s Mother that her daughter was nearly sexually assaulted in a pantry at a Fraternity party at approximately midnight, September 18. Add additionally, Groves speaks to a man claiming to be assaulted due to his sexual preference, which would be considered a hate crime, also reportable under the Clery Act. According to Groves and Fielding no police report has been filed. (Editors Note: If this took place at the same “undisclosed frat” as the 3am forcible fondling and robbery incidents– Is this the same perp? So he never fled the scene? So, we have 2 incidents that have Charlottesville PD police reports, one of a sex crime in nature, and an additional attempted sex crime reported directly to administration on 9/20 within a three hour span, at either the same fraternity, or a neighboring one, and it takes 8 days to notify anyone, and they still have not interviewed anyone at the “undisclosed” frat regarding the incidents?

9-21 Internal Meeting about the 9/17 forcible rape but to UVA, they are  “unclear” sex assault occurs, still no contact with, or direct information with the victim. ( Editors Note: Groves says Charlottesville PD has still not classified the incident as a sex assault. (Editors Note: This is ludicrous and utter bs. The report specifically states “forcible rape”.  I can tell you as an absolute fact, that members of the sorority AS WELL AS the other sororities on Chancellor sent emails back and forth to alert each other which specifically included details of the assault).

9-21 Associate Dean contacts Cville PD. Was told .. Yes, investigating the incident, but would not be in a position to disclose whether there had been an assault or sexual assault  also, at that point. We then conferred with the university police to see if there was anything they could tell us so that we could determine whether or not a sex assault occurred in that setting.

9-23 Sorority Meeting held, without the victim, to discuss outreach opportunities.

9-27 First time Associate dean heard directly from the victim in response to the outreach efforts, first time she was in a position to come forward (out of hospital). Victim had to cancel and has rescheduled.

9-28 “.. Certainly by last evening… after conferring with Lt. Fielding and others I felt we had enough information.. Even though to my knowledge Charlottesville Police have not classified this as a sexual assault..”  but we believe we had enough, even though it was not our investigation, it was Charlottesville Police responsibility to alert..” (Editors Note: Not a syllable about the email I sent to Ms. Wood, who was unaware of the incident, and very responsive to me. The alert went out at 11:01 PM, 45 minutes after our article regarding same, was published. In this editors opinion, there were no plans whatsoever to alert students until I requested a comment, specifying it was to be included in the piece we were finishing regarding the fact that the rape had not yet been disclosed as an alert, as required by the Clery Act.  This was done to balance what was certain to be seen as a scandalous announcement in the wake of Morgan Harrington and Yeardley Love murders, and days after the University’s “Day of Dialogue.”  I felt they should certainly be offered an opportunity to address the issue from their perspective, the email was their response to that invitation).

Clearly A Clery Violation… Again

The Articles for reporting within the Clery Act are unambiguous. While I understand the need to alert students and parents with credible and useful information, this is not for UVA officials to decide unilaterally. In fact, it is not for them to ever need to “corroborate” or interview a victim regarding the details of any crime committed against them as identified in the Clery Act for UVA to observe the requirements of them under the Federal law.

In short, they have their own police. They have their “online form”. They have Charlottesville PD police report direct feed.

In 2004, The Board of Education found that UVA violated the Clery Act by requiring a rape victim to sign a confidentiality agreement, but gave them a pass by not imposing sanctions because there was some confusion as to the reporting rules and protocol. UVA was informed they will be assessed a $27,500 sanction fee for any future violations.

As I am certain many of you are over my bloviations about the subject, and in the interest of disclosure, I have personal ties to Lehigh University.

Also in the interest of disclosure, I am embarrassed to say that I was not aware that Ms. Clery’s murder occurred there until researching the Clery Act.

Some Posts from members of your local community for consumption, I will be updating poignant comments.

Blinkoncrime.com Poster Starbucks:

Regarding the “off grounds” issue, I’m sorry but I find University’s excuses in this area ludicrous and totally disingenuous.

The Clery Act, passed in 1990, unambiguously provides that its reporting requirements are not limited to crimes occurring on campus/”Grounds.” The University has had twenty years to figure out how to comply with this law, and yet its officials act as dumbfounded as ever. One would think that UVA is the only school in the nation with a significant portion of its student body living off campus/Grounds, but in close proximity to the University. Of course, this situation is commonplace.

If UVA is having such a difficult time dealing with the “off grounds” issue, I suggest that President Sullivan get in contact with the appropriate officials at her previous institutions. Sullivan spent most of her career at the University of Texas where 80% of its undergraduate student body lives off campus, as opposed to 57% at UVA. She then spent about four years at the University of Michigan where 37% of its undergraduates live off campus. There is no need to reinvent the wheel here; if UVA officials can’t figure out how to report crimes occurring near its campus, they should go study how other universities are dealing with this perplexing problem.

The implication that there is no communication between the Charlottesville Police and the UVA police/campus officials simply stretches the bounds of credulity.

UVA is required by the Clery Act to provide:

(C) A statement of current policies concerning campus law enforcement, including—

(ii) the working relationship of campus security personnel with State and local law enforcement agencies, including whether the institution has agreements with such agencies, such as written memoranda of understanding, for the investigation of alleged criminal offenses; and

(iii) policies which encourage accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to the campus police and the appropriate law enforcement agencies.

I can’t seem to find UVA’s policies in this area. I challenge the University to prominently publish all of the required Clery Act policy statements on its website.

UVA is on notice:

“This determination finds that the University violated the Clery Act. However, as was noted in our July 2004 Final Determination in another case, there was apparent confusion in the higher education community regarding the intersection of the disclosure requirement under the Clery Act and the strictures of FERPA. For this reason, the Department will not impose any fines or other sanctions at this time. However, UVA is advised that any subsequent violations of the Clery Act will result in a referral for the imposition of a civil penalty up to $27,500 per infraction.”

http://federalstudentaid.ed.gov/datacenter/cleryact/uva/UVAProgramReviewReport11032008.pdf

So please UVA, stop the excuses and clean up your act now.

Respectfully submitted via BlinkOnCrime

Madeline Tanner, Elizabeth Morton, contributing editors

Preparing Children to Be Safe at College

September 23, 2010 Comments off

Preparing Children to Be Safe at College


Money can buy many things to help children excel academically, like tutors and private school educations. But as those children go off to college, the one thing otherwise protective parents typically do not spend money on is making sure their children do not become victims of a crime.

One reason is cost. The price of protection ranges from consultations billed at several hundred dollars an hour to Ostrander International’s security assessment and training program, mainly for the children of international business executives, royalty and celebrities, which starts at $41,000 for the first year.

Parents may also believe that security at college is not something they have to worry about.

But just because you are paying tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of dollars for your child’s education does not mean the university is a safe place.

A report released this week by Insite Security is sure to shake parents’ confidence. The security firm analyzed crime statistics on and around the campuses of the eight Ivy League colleges as well as Duke, Stanford, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Chicago. This study was intriguing because it looked not only at the on-campus statistics that colleges are required to report, it also took into account crime in the areas where students socialize off campus. (The off-campus statistics were drawn from the F.B.I.’s uniform crime report.)

The Insite report, whose data goes only to 2008, said three-quarters of the colleges and their surrounding areas had sex offense rates that were 83 percent higher than the national rape average, with Dartmouth having the highest rate. It said that Harvard had the highest rate of burglary among the 12.

“Keeping kids safe or making a wise decision about where your kids go to school is more complicated than reviewing the police log at the college security office,” said Christopher Falkenberg, president of Insite.

In response to the report, Sylvia Spears, dean of Dartmouth, said, “Increased reporting is not necessarily an indicator of increased sexual violence on campus but may be indicative of better education about sexual violence and increased awareness of various services and offices on a campus that are available to a victim.”

A spokesman for Harvard said, “It is important to note that how property crimes are classified and reported varies from school to school, and when you look at property crime statistics as a whole, Harvard does not lead in the rankings.”

For prominent families, the costs of a security plan to reduce these risks are part of life, but for most affluent families, such security is prohibitively expensive — even though their children may be just as susceptible to crime.

Several security advisers I spoke with offered advice to wealthy families contemplating security plans while also providing tips to parents of more modest means.

TOP THREATS Curtis Ostrander, the founder of Ostrander International and former vice president for risk management and public safety at Cornell, said the biggest threat he sought to counter was students’ belief that nothing was going to happen to them.

His business focuses on the top targets for campus crime: international students and children from affluent homes. It might seem obvious that someone adjusting to a new culture while getting used to college could run into problems. But children from families who are upper-middle class and higher on the wealth ladder are often naïve about personal security, and that makes them targets for theft, alcohol-related crimes and sexual assault.

“If you grew up in a poorer neighborhood, you’d be more aware of someone coming up behind you and stealing your bag,” Mr. Ostrander said.

He added that the very rich were the least prepared: “Having security growing up makes it worse because they never had to consider the threats.”

Mr. Falkenberg said a new scam illustrated this problem. It starts with an attractive, older woman pretending to fall in love with a wealthy male student in the hope of getting pregnant, if not married, and laying claim to his family’s money.

“They’re dweebishly nerdy kids, and the story is always the same,” he said. “It’s really hard because you have to tell the kid this is not the love of his life.”

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Regardless of the threat, the key is to work with students before they leave for college. And this is where the fees for one-on-one preparation start to climb.

Mr. Ostrander, for example, has a psychologist and a self-defense instructor on staff, and he will work personally with the student in the home country or on campus. Thomas Ruskin, president of CMP Protective and Investigative Group, said his agents had accompanied clients’ children on trips in the guise of tour guides or drivers, but had also done simple things like monitoring tracking technology on their cellphones.

“It’s about teaching them how to leave the nest but also to teach them what they’ve been protected from,” Mr. Ruskin said.

Short of hiring an expensive consultant, parents themselves can do more to prepare children for what can happen on campus. For male students, the main worries are being beaten up or involved in an alcohol-related crime, and for women, the concerns center on sexual assault.

Yet Mr. Ostrander says parents usually do not do enough to prepare children for theft and computer scams. These include the infamous Nigerian prince asking for money and more personalized scams devised from the abundance of personal information on the Web. “Some of us say that’s just common sense, but not for people without a lot of life experience,” he said.

PARENTAL ANXIETY Thinking about what could happen to your child is enough to send the most level-headed parent into overprotective mode. Yet the experts offered some simple steps for parents to take. Encourage your daughter to use the buddy system when she goes to a party and have a plan if she or a friend drinks too much. Another is to use campus escorts at night.

Even with prominent children, less can be more. “It’s a little bit of a give and take with security,” Mr. Ruskin said. “It’s a necessary evil, but you don’t want to go overboard and then you’re smothering the person.”

The worst thing a parent can do for a child, the experts agreed, is send a bodyguard to class. The same goes for the middle-class parent repeatedly warning a child not to drink. That could lead to worse behavior.

“We don’t say, ‘Don’t drink,’ ” Mr. Ostrander said. “We say, ‘If you drink, here are some of the possible problems.’ ” He added, “I teach these kids in classes, but these are the same skills they will use the rest of their lives to be safe.”

And that is what any parent wants from college.

Respectfully submitted via New York Times.

How much is your daughter’s life worth?  You cannot put a price tag on her life.  She will have personal safety skills; mentally, emotionally and ultimately physically (if taught properly) for the rest of her life.  She is worth the investment!

College campus rape rate 10 times higher than Detroit’s? Don’t believe everything the Justice Department tells you…

September 19, 2010 Comments off

College campus rape rate 10 times higher than Detroit’s.  Don’t believe everything the Justice Department tells you!


As college students poured back into classrooms, ABC Nightline breathlessly reported (and other news outlets and blogs echoed): “A recent study from the Department of Justice estimated that 25 percent  of (1 out of 4) college women will be victims of rape or attempted rape before they graduate within a four-year college period.”

The short statement is enough to make parents think twice before sending their daughter to college. Despite the seriousness of the claim, the hook is riddled with inaccuracies and misrepresentations — not least of which is the actual statistic.

Indeed, nearly 50 percent of the “rape victims” referred to in the report said they had not been raped.

The document in question, “Acquaintance Rape of College Students,” by attorney Rana Sampson, is not a study but rather a report combining and relying on several studies — the largest of which remains problematic.

Sampson released her report more than four years ago and though the Justice Department provided her with some funding, she was not a Justice Department employee. “The opinions contained herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Justice,” the report disclaims.

The one-in-four statistic, according to footnotes, is derived from a study conducted in 2000 called, “The Sexual Victimization of College Women” (SVCW), by Bonnie S. Fisher, Francis T. Cullen and Michael G. Turner.

Dr. Neil Gilbert, a professor of social welfare at University California, Berkeley, told The Daily Caller that the SVCW’s numbers are severely inflated due to the study’s broad definition of rape and the manner in which subjects were questioned.

According to Gilbert, the SVCW study results found a rate of rape that was 10 times higher than when the methodology for the National Crime Victimization Study (NCVS) was used. Namely, “the National Crime Victimization study had a check to make sure that the codes [or definitions of rape, force, etc.] of responses reflected the interviewees precise description. The SVCW study did not use this type of control on coding,” Gilbert explained.

In the SVCW study, researchers asked subjects to explain what happened to them and then decided, using their own definitions, what was and was not rape. The study defined rape in exceptionally wide terms: “Forced sexual intercourse including both psychological coercion as well as physical force. Forced sexual intercourse means vaginal, anal or oral penetration by the offender(s). This category also includes incidents where the penetration is from a foreign object such as a bottle. Includes attempted rapes, male as well as female victims, and both heterosexual and homosexual rape. Attempted rape includes verbal threats of rape.”

The inclusion of the phrase “psychological coercion” as part of the definition greatly increased the number of “victims.”

In an interview with TheDC, Sampson made no distinction between violent rape and regret after seduction. “Rape is rape is rape,” she said. “I think that the kind of harm that one experiences during rape is not something we want to belittle.”

Apart from the hair-raising 25 percent figure, the SVCW study reports that when those categorized as rape victims were asked if what they described was rape, nearly 50 percent said “no.” Further, 80 percent of the subjects researchers labeled as rape victims stated that the incident resulted in neither physical or emotional injuries. Only 5 percent of those identified as victims of rape actually reported the incident. “If an attorney defending a rapist were to use this, they’d say ‘Well, what’s the big deal? 80 percent of women who are raped don’t have any adverse affects,’” Gilbert said.

“It expands the definition in a way that it includes a lot of events — you know sexual activity at that age can be confusing, there is regret after, there are break ups, all kinds of things that go on,” Gilbert said.

But, according to Sampson many women do not actually realized they have been raped. “It often doesn’t register as rape to women because it does not look like the image they have in their mind. It turns out that image is not the most common type of rape and that is why so many people are able to get away with it,” she said.

Manhattan Institute fellow Heather Mac Donald put Sampson’s rape report numbers up against Detroit’s, a city with one of the highest violent crime rates of any city in the country. In that city, at the time of the report’s release, the violent crime rate was 2.4 percent, which includes crimes of rape, murder, assault and robbery.

“If 25 percent of all college women were experiencing a violent crime rate that was 10 times higher than anything experienced in the most violent areas, colleges would be transformed. They would be shut down,” Mac Donald told TheDC. “Parents would not be clamoring to get their daughters into Harvard and Yale and Brown and Wesleyan and every other college. You would have a massive revamping of admissions processes because what this statistic says is that colleges are letting in tens of thousands of violent criminals.”

While reports such as Nightline’s scream about an epidemic, Mac Donald says college rape hotlines are silent. “I mean they are so desperate to find rape that at Yale, for instance, they have thrown out the rule that the accuser has the right to confront his victim, which is a cornerstone of our Anglo-Saxon common law heritage. This is at Yale.”

Gilbert said that the desire to inflate the numbers comes down to funding. “These studies have been used to get funding for women’s centers on college campuses,” Gilbert said. “I call it advocacy research, these people mean well and have legitimate concerns. But at some point they exaggerate so much that it is no longer a problem but the norm and with studies like this they risk doing just that.”

Apart from the hair-raising 25 percent figure, the SVCW study reports that when those categorized as rape victims were asked if what they described was rape, nearly 50 percent said “no.” Further, 80 percent of the subjects researchers labeled as rape victims stated that the incident resulted in neither physical or emotional injuries. Only 5 percent of those identified as victims of rape actually reported the incident. “If an attorney defending a rapist were to use this, they’d say ‘Well, what’s the big deal? 80 percent of women who are raped don’t have any adverse affects,’” Gilbert said.

“It expands the definition in a way that it includes a lot of events — you know sexual activity at that age can be confusing, there is regret after, there are break ups, all kinds of things that go on,” Gilbert said.

But, according to Sampson many women do not actually realized they have been raped. “It often doesn’t register as rape to women because it does not look like the image they have in their mind. It turns out that image is not the most common type of rape and that is why so many people are able to get away with it,” she said.

Manhattan Institute fellow Heather Mac Donald put Sampson’s rape report numbers up against Detroit’s, a city with one of the highest violent crime rates of any city in the country. In that city, at the time of the report’s release, the violent crime rate was 2.4 percent, which includes crimes of rape, murder, assault and robbery.

“If 25 percent of all college women were experiencing a violent crime rate that was 10 times higher than anything experienced in the most violent areas, colleges would be transformed. They would be shut down,” Mac Donald told TheDC. “Parents would not be clamoring to get their daughters into Harvard and Yale and Brown and Wesleyan and every other college. You would have a massive revamping of admissions processes because what this statistic says is that colleges are letting in tens of thousands of violent criminals.”

While reports such as Nightline’s scream about an epidemic, Mac Donald says college rape hotlines are silent. “I mean they are so desperate to find rape that at Yale, for instance, they have thrown out the rule that the accuser has the right to confront his victim, which is a cornerstone of our Anglo-Saxon common law heritage. This is at Yale.”

Gilbert said that the desire to inflate the numbers comes down to funding. “These studies have been used to get funding for women’s centers on college campuses,” Gilbert said. “I call it advocacy research, these people mean well and have legitimate concerns. But at some point they exaggerate so much that it is no longer a problem but the norm and with studies like this they risk doing just that.”

A look at one alarming case of sexual assault on campus, a widespread crime that is vastly underreported.  Some statistics in this clip have changed due to more current reporting and review.

Respectfully submitted via…The Daily Caller, Caroline May

Duke University Sophomore Arrested on Rape Charge…

September 15, 2010 2 comments

Duke University Sophomore Arrested on Rape Charge…

A sophomore withdrew from the University Thursday after being arrested for the alleged second-degree rape and first-degree kidnapping of a fellow student.

Eric Irons, a 19-year-old from Hong Kong, was arrested by Duke Police and taken into custody Wednesday, 9/8/10. He was charged and released the same day on a $75,000 bond, according to court records. A district court date has been set for Nov. 9.

Irons allegedly assaulted a female student at a party on Central Campus April 17, according to the probable cause affadavit, part of the application for a search warrant submitted by the Duke University Police Department. Several witnesses described the alleged victim as “very intoxicated” at the party, according to the affadavit. The next day, the alleged victim went to the Duke University Medical Center’s Emergency Department, where a sexual assault kit was used.

Michael Schoenfeld, vice president for public affairs and government relations, wrote in an e-mail that the DUPD investigation was conducted in a “timely manner,” but the incident was not included in the initial DUPD crime log to protect the alleged victim, avoid jeopardizing the investigation and prevent the destruction of evidence. He added that DUPD has the right to not report incidents in special cases, such as during ongoing investigations.

DUPD submitted a search warrant application to the magistrate Sept. 7 to procure DNA swabs from Irons and samples of his head and pubic hair, saliva and blood. The evidence was collected by DUPD and Emergency Department workers Sept. 8, according to the search warrant.

“The University’s principal concern is for the health and safety of the victim and the members of the Duke community,” Schoenfeld wrote. “We take reports of sexual assault very seriously and, through DUPD and other services available on campus, work to ensure that the rights of victims and those under investigation are respected and protected.”

Irons declined to comment and referred questions to Durham lawyer Bill Thomas, who could not be reached.

According to the affadavit, Irons admitted in “a subsequent interview” that he engaged in sexual conduct with the alleged victim but denied having sexual intercourse.

According to state statutes, second-degree rape is defined as vaginal intercourse “by force and against the will of the other person.” First-degree kidnapping is the unlawful confining, restraining or removal of a person from one place to another, the result being that “the person kidnapped either was not released by the defendant in a safe place or had been seriously injured or sexually assaulted,” the statutes state.

Schoenfeld referred questions about the prosecution of the case to the district attorney’s office, which could not immediately be reached for comment.

Student Affairs officials have been in contact with Irons and his parents, Schoenfeld said.

Dean of Students Sue Wasiolek said she cannot comment on ongoing criminal cases involving students, but she said the University considers each incident of this nature with great care.

“It’s a difficult balance to strike whenever we are attempting to preserve the rights and the safety of both the students that are involved in the cases and the rest of the community,” she said. “That is something that we take very seriously.”

Via The Chronicle – Duke University

Interestingly I have found nothing in our media about this assault other than the University newspaper.  Why not?  Why shouldn’t other students, campuses, universities, females, and communities be made aware of this information?  Talk about “hush, hush”.

UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE STATS (BASED ON NUMBERS ONLY BEING REPORTED….5% REPORTED!

1 out of 4 females in college will be sexually assaulted/raped BEFORE graduation.

95% of victims DO NOT report being victimized.

MAJOR WAKE-UP CALL – VICTIMIZATION IS NEVER YOUR FAULT!

Section 9 funding and the reporting requirements of the Jean Cleary Act are being drastically being UNDER REPORTED.  Reporting of victimization does affect funding to colleges and universities.  This MUST stop!  Our females are not educated nor know what procedures they should and must take when victimized.  Know the policy and procedures at your school for reporting.  If the University has “SWORN POLICE OFFICERS” report the assault immediately AND PRESS CHARGES, go to the local hospital for reporting and exam and visit your local Rape Crisis Agency or call RAINN.org.  You have every right as well to file a report and press charges with the local city/town police department.

NEVER ALLOW ANYONE TO TELL YOU THAT THEY WILL LOOK INTO THINGS…GET YOUR DOCUMENTATION OF THE REPORT AND ARREST WARRANT.  BE SURE TO TAKE YOUR EXAM RESULTS, CERTIFIED ADVOCATE FROM THE AGENCY WITHIN THE COUNTY WITH YOU AS SHE KNOWS THE LAWS AND YOUR RIGHTS!

Do not settle for a “peer advocate” or “faculty advocate”….YOU WANT/NEED a certified rape crisis advocate who has no influence nor connection with your school.  Her soul interest is to protect and to provide FOR YOU!

Take care and STAY SAFE!

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