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Posts Tagged ‘Trafficking’

HereWomenTalk Expert Team Scored Big!

September 16, 2010 Comments off

HereWomenTalk Expert Team Scored Big!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Women Social Network, Here Women Talk, saved a young woman’s life when she reached out to Dottie Laster during her live online radio show, “Trafficked”.  Dottie with a team of experts were able to reach this young woman, assisted her in her escape from being trafficked to freedom, established her in safety WITHIN 24 HOURS!  This team worked diligently, non-stop for 24+ hours to rescue this innocent child of 19 years old!

TRAFFICKED with Dottie Laster

Thursday, 1-2 pm EDT (10-11 am Pacific)

Horrific true stories and happy-ending stories about people saved from the fastest growing crime in the world. Live this week:  Poet Laureate for Human Rights Larry Jaffe with a poem on genocide; Francis Bok, escaped slave from Sudan;  and Elizabeth Crooks who shelters victims of trafficking.  Chat-in or Call (646) 652-2071

Thank you Team – ^5, awesome team work!  And, who says it can’t be done.  It has just been proven that when a victim reaches out a job can get done.  Nothing will stand in the way of advocacy.


YOUNG SURVIVORS OF SEX TRAFFICKING ORGANIZE IN NYC

June 25, 2010 1 comment

YOUNG SURVIVORS OF SEX TRAFFICKING ORGANIZE IN NYC

On Saturday June 26, 2010, from 12 – 4:00 pm, Girls Educational Mentoring Service (GEMS) will host the 5th annual New York State End Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC) Day in Central Park (Merchant’s Gate Park 59th Street entrance). The event will honor survivors as well as educate the public on the issue of commercial sexual exploitation and domestic trafficking. The 5th Annual NYS End CSEC Day is being organized by the GEMS Youth Outreach Team, survivors of commercial sexual exploitation and domestic trafficking who serve as leaders in the movement and advocate for their peers at the local, national and international level including through the NY State Legislature, US Congress and the United Nations. The day will include featured speakers and fun activities such as games, contests, and Double Dutch to engage and educate attendees who support survivors and those who wish to learn more about the issue of commercial sexual exploitation and domestic trafficking.

As the only organization in New York City and the largest in the nation specifically designed to provide services to domestically trafficked and sexually exploited girls and young women, GEMS launched New York State End CSEC Day in 2005 at the height of their advocacy for the passage of the Safe Harbor for Exploited Children Act, landmark legislation that provides sexually exploited children under the age of 16 with comprehensive services in lieu of prosecution and incarceration. End CSEC Day is both a celebration of survivor voices and survivor leadership and a call to awareness and action to end the trafficking and exploitation of children and youth in NY state.  “Through community outreach and organizing events such as End CSEC Day, survivors are utilizing their voices and power to make New York State a better place for their peers,” says Rachel Lloyd, the Founder and Executive Director of GEMS.

“Commercial sexual exploitation has been an area that many people find challenging to deal with. End CSEC Day provides an opportunity for the public to engage and have fun as well as become educated about commercial sexual exploitation and domestic trafficking. It also creates a positive environment for girls to interact with the people who support them,” says Sheila, a GEMS Outreach member and event organizer.

For more information on attending the 5th annual New York State End Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC) Day, contact Muhammida El Muhajir 718.496.2305.

For more information about GEMS, visit www.gems-girls.org.

The 5th Annual New YorkState End Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC) Day Saturday, June 26, 2010, 12 – 4:00pm

Central Park (Merchant’s Gate Park 59th Street entrance)

U.S. Finally Includes Itself in Human Trafficking Report

June 22, 2010 Comments off

U.S. Finally Includes Itself in Human Trafficking Report

June 22, 2010 by Kate Noftsinger, Ms.blog

The U.S. State Department just released the tenth installment of the annual Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report. What’s new in 2010? The removal of one little asterisked disclaimer: “*does not include the United States,” which indicates a very big deal.

That message, which appeared on each report from 2001 to 2009, is gone; the United States now receives a ranking on its trafficking-prevention efforts, like the rest of the world, and victims’ testimonials include domestic accounts like this one:

Harriet ran away from home when she was 11 years old and moved in with a 32-year-old man who sexually and physically abused her and convinced her to become a prostitute. … The police arrested Harriet when she was 13 and charged her with committing prostitution.  They made no efforts to find her pimp. Harriet was placed on probation for 18 months in the custody of juvenile probation officials. Her lawyers have appealed the decision, arguing that since she could not legally consent to sex, she cannot face prostitution-related charges.

The report classifies countries into three tiers based on their compliance with the minimum standards of eliminating trafficking set by the United States in the 2000 Trafficking Victims Protection Act. And these minimums are indeed minimal: that governments have laws that prohibit and punish trafficking, and that they actively pursue trafficking investigations. Predictably, the United States made the most favored first tier. Further rankings could be mistaken for a worldwide popularity contest. Greece and Switzerland are both tier two. Countries like Thailand and India are on a tier two “watch list.” The Congo, Iran and Saudi Arabia are on the third tier.

It’s debatable whether these annual rankings or the international promise-to-try agreement (the 2000 TVPA) are having any effect on the trafficking epidemic. In 2001, it was believed that at least 700,000 persons were being trafficked worldwide. Last year, that number had reached 12.3 million and remained there through 2010.

Women continue to make up 56 percent of the world’s trafficking victims. Why? Depends on the year. In 2001, social and cultural practices that devalue women were to blame. In 2009, women’s social and economic dependence on men was believed to be the problem. Both of these, though true, looked like attempts to remove the “empowered” women of the U.S. from the equation. The 2009 report also said that “in countries where women’s economic status had improved, significantly fewer local women participate in commercial sex.”

But this mindset obscures an important truth: Even in countries like the U.S. with high average incomes, poverty persists and poor populations are still vulnerable to trafficking.

Take a city as (seemingly) innocuous as Toledo, Ohio. According to February’s state report, Toledo is currently number four in the nation in terms of the number of arrests, investigation, and rescues of domestic-minor sex-trafficking victims among U.S. cities (behind Miami, Portland and Las Vegas.) Let that register: Children are being bought and sold for sex in the “heartland” of America–not brought from overseas, but drawn from local populations. Ohio had 1,078 victims under the age of 18 in the last year. The TVPA (and every TIP Report) unequivocally state that all such prostitution of minors constitutes trafficking:

The act defines “severe forms of trafficking in persons” as sex trafficking in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age; or the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.

The 2010 TIP Report also makes clear that an effective approach to trafficking involves helping, not prosecuting, victims. Celia Williamson, associate professor of social work at the University of Toledo founded the Second Chance program with this rehabilitation method back in 1993. But she still sees victims being treated like criminals elsewhere in her community. She estimated more than half of domestically trafficked women and girls in this country are wrongfully arrested for solicitation, loitering and prostitution. And many adults found prostituting on their own were originally trafficked as children. “[The] country is illegally incarcerating and re-traumatizing [victims],” she said, “so how can we ask these kids to come forward about this underground victimization?”

And while the U.S. has a lengthy prescription for how to combat global trafficking, there is a communication breakdown at the state level. “Even though [the TVPA is] in the federal law, that doesn’t mean anything,”  Williamson said. The Ohio Trafficking in Persons Study Commission found that:

Law enforcement agencies expressed a need for training, indicating they are both unaware of the problem in their communities and how to recognize signs of a victim of sex or labor trafficking or a human trafficking business or entity. … They did not understand criminal justice system procedures pertaining to human trafficking, and are unfamiliar with both Ohio and federal laws.

Given this, of the 11,144 prostitution-related charges in Ohio in the last five years, how many were actually incidents of trafficking?

Internal reports like this cast doubt on whether the U.S. really deserved its cushy tier-one placement. But other research shows at least one group of U.S. lawmakers pushing for progress: A study conducted by Vanessa Bouche, a Ph.D. candidate at Ohio State University and a member of the Greater Cincinnati Human Trafficking Report research team, found that the more women there are on a legislature, the more likely anti-trafficking legislation will pass and be comprehensive.

And, of course, it’s a woman–Secretary of State Hillary Clinton–who has finally included the U.S. in its own anti-trafficking report. She has put the second-largest sex purchaser in the world on the road to recovery–because admitting you have a problem is the first step.


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