Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Yale University’

Back By Popular Demand, Anny Jacoby and Crime Time with Vito Colucci, Part 2

September 9, 2011 Comments off

Sunday Night, September 11, 11pm ET

on Business Talk Radio

Listen LIVE: http://businesstalkradio.net/weekend_host/ctvc.shtml

Back for another run!  Vito Colucci invites Anny Jacoby back to the show to continue the conversation.  On this show they will discuss the importance of college campus safety, street smarts, carjacking and safety, stranger asking for directions, and knowing your surroundings.  Everyone will want to listen to the information on this show to know how to stay safe in a dangerous world!

Crime Time with Vito Colucci, P.I.  features anything crime related. Current high profile cases or trials are discussed in detail with commentary from experts in law  enforcement, investigators and lawyers.

Vito Colucci, Jr.

Vito Colucci, Jr., owner of Colucci Investigations LLC, is a former member of the Stamford, CT Police Department where he worked as a Narcotic’s Detective and Undercover Organized Crime Investigator. One of the main investigations Vito spearheaded during that time was uncovering the organized crime ties within his own police department.

Vito has been a private investigator for the past 22 years, working many high profile cases; Michael Skakel/Martha Moxley case, Jayson William’s case, and honeymooner, George Smith’s case .

Vito Colucci is a regular commentator on various news programs including: Fox News MSNBC, Catherine Crier/Court TV, Star Jones, Glenn Beck, Nancy Grace, Larry King, CNN Headline News, and The Bill O’Reilly Show, as well as being a featured speaker at the first World Investigator’s Conference in LasVegas in 2005.

Anny’s mission is to reach out to every avenue available to teach these skills at the corporate level, to emergency services, victim support groups and agencies, schools, colleges and health service providers.  Her professional programs are designed for every age group from children to seniors, as well as a program designed specifically for the disabled.

Recently, Anny has developed a new division to her company, Project Safe Girls, which is designed specifically for girls and is used in after school programs, girl’s organizations and YWCAs, to name a few of the target areas.  Specific curriculum and training is developed for age appropriate

Anny’s program is not traditional “self-defense” nor martial arts or weapons.  She has developed her training specifically for females and teaches them to use their bodies as their weapon to diffuse a violent situation.

Anny’s style is serious, with compassion and empathy, yet fun and empowering. Her training classes and seminars leave her students with a sense of confidence and an understanding of their intuitions regarding safety. Anny has authored a comprehensive training manual for each student to take with them as reference.

Anny Jacoby is available for speaking engagements, lectures, individual consultations and presentations. She is a Certified PDR (Personal Defense Readiness) Instructor and has a team of male Certified PDR instructors and coaches with The Realistic Female Self-Defense Company who are dedicated to teaching and training only females.

Anny is also an independent contractor as a Certified Prevention Specialist and an Authorized Stewards of Children Facilitator through the Darkness to Light prevention program.  She has developed a passion for educating parents and communities about the issue of child sexual abuse and prevention. She is available to travel throughout the US bringing this important and vital information to all.

For media appearances and inquires or speaking engagements please contact: ImaginePublicity, contact@imaginepublicity.com; 843-808-0859

 

Release produced by ImaginePublicity

Annie Le’s death at Yale puts spotlight on campus security…

August 21, 2011 1 comment

Video surveillance cameras, live cameras monitored 24/7 and official warnings that can be blasted in seconds to tens of thousands via email, cell phone text messages and Facebook. Campus security is more sophisticated than ever, but college officials say they still can’t absolutely guarantee the safety of their students.

“That is impossible,” says Melissa Essary, dean of the Campbell Law School in Raleigh, NC. “There will always be criminals out there who can get away from the best security system.”

Since the Virginia Tech killings, schools around the country have beefed up security substantially, she says. Her school has just one public entrance, staffed full time by a security officer. But a potentially dangerous situation could erupt from within, she says.   “There are potential inside threats as well as outside threats,” Essary says.

Though many colleges have surveillance cameras, only some are live while others are recording devices that would only be examined after the fact, not when a crime is actually occurring.

Student security isn’t only the responsibility of the college, says John Carroll, head of safety and security for all three Fordham campuses. “It is a shared responsibility for the individual, for campus security,  and for the police department,” he says. “I’m sure I speak for my peers at other schools when I say that we will all take a strong look at the Yale incident just like we took a look at Virginia Tech to make sure we are doing everything humanly possible to protect our students.”

Fordham can text, voice and email all 15,000 students in seconds, he says, and a year and a half ago, when an emotionally disturbed person crashed through the gates, the college was able to warn everyone to stay away from the library, where the man, armed with a gun, was headed. “We contained the man and we were able to let everyone know,” Carroll says.

At Pratt Institute, security officers patrol the campus on foot, by car, and on bikes. There are hundreds of closed circuit TV cameras, emergency phones in campus buildings and outdoors, and a strictly enforced card-access only policy to the residence halls, according to William Schmitz, Pratt’s director of safety and security.

Many colleges are starting to use Facebook and Twitter to get out warnings to students, according to the Orlando Sentinel. Their goal is to use social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter to reach as many students as possible as quickly as possible, according to the Sentinel.   The sites offer yet another way to communicate news to students. University of Florida is testing an indoor speaker system that uses Voice Over Internet Protocol, according to the Sentinel, in which announcements can be heard in almost all classrooms.

Still, officials say, it’s impossible to say that a college will always be completely safe.

“A college or university campus is a microcosm of our society,” Schmitz says. “While campus safety and security departments are invested in and committed to safeguarding campuses and students to the fullest extent possible, unfortunately crimes may still may occur.”

The reality of one’s safety and protection ultimately lies within one’s self, never rely upon another individual, staff or a college for you or your daughter’s safety.

Our children/daughters often never learn “life skills” to get them through life.  “Life skills” must be taught to every female of every age.  It’s not being paranoid, it’s about being smart and having tools in your toolbox (mentally and physically) to rely upon.  Learning about awareness, gut instincts and the smell of potential danger can save one’s life.

PREVENTION IS THE ANSWER!

Take care and STAY SAFE!

Contributor in part: NYDailyNews

Back to School: Spotlighting Campus Crimes and Violence…

July 12, 2011 Comments off

It is time to get ready for campus life, with September right around the corner.  Project Safe Girls wants you to be aware and prepared. Awareness is a good first step toward protecting yourself. Being prepared is the best defense.

Campus crimes occur much more frequently than any of us realize. Crimes on College Campuses and crimes nearby college campuses frequently go unreported and/or under reported. A recent study by The U.S. Department of Justice on The Sexual Victimization of College Women reveals some disturbing statistics. Among the findings:

  • Annually 4.9% of college Co-Eds experience a rape. In other words, the victimization rate is 49 rapes per 1000 female students.
  • When one considers that the average college career now lasts 5 years, there is a 25% likelihood of a rape between Freshman Orientation and Graduation Day.
  • This data becomes more disturbing when analyzed by the number of incidents rather than the number of victims. When the analysis is based on incident count the rate increases by nearly 30%. This takes into account women who have been victimized more than once.
  • Crimes categorized as sexual victimization other than rape touched 3.4%, or 34 per 1000, college Co-Eds annually.
  • This data also becomes more disturbing when analyzed by the number of incidents rather than the number of victims. Analyzed this way, the rate increases by a whopping 397%.
  • 9 out of 10 victims know the person who sexually victimizes them.
  • 71% of sexual victimization of college women occurs on a date – known more commonly as date rape.
  • 88%of sexual crimes against women occur between the hours of 6 pm and 6 am.
  • Sexual victimization of college Co-Eds most often occurs in a residence (on or off campus), with nearly 60% occurring in the victim’s own residence, 30% occurring in other campus living quarters and 10% at a Fraternity.
  • Overwhelmingly, data indicates that women who attempt to protect or defend themselves avoid becoming the victim of a completed rape. While protecting or defending oneself is not a 100% guarantee, it is overwhelmingly the best action to take in order to avoid becoming the victim of a completed rape.
  • In the instances where women used force or a self-defense product like pepper spray, Mace, a stun gun or a Taser, just under 31% of the attempted rapes resulted in completed rapes.
  • Shockingly, fewer than 5% of completed or attempted rapes are actually reported to law enforcement officials. Reasons indicated for not doing so include: Not serious enough to report; not clear a crime was committed; not wanting family or others to know; lack of proof; fear of reprisal by the assailant; fear of hostility by police and fear police would not believe the incident occurred or was serious enough.
  • Another frequent and unwanted violation of women on college campuses is stalking. An annual incidence rate 156.5 stalkings per 1000 Co-Eds is reported. Clearly this is a bigger problem and requires further attention, study and consideration.

If you are assaulted or in a dating violence relationship PLEASE REPORT THE INCIDENT to your campus police department AND PRESS CHARGES!  ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS PRESS CRIMINAL CHARGES!  And, I strongly suggest that you go to the local DV or Rape Crisis agency in your college community as well as filing a POLICE REPORT WITH THE TOWN/CITY POLICE DEPARTMENTS!  Cover all of your bases.  Do not leave any rock unturned.

Too many assailants, universities and colleges are getting away with sweeping college crimes under the carpet.  DO NOT ALLOW THIS TO HAPPEN TO YOU!  Remember, YOU DID NOT DESERVE IT!  IT IS NOT YOUR FAULT!

Parents – get involved in your daughter’s safety during college.  Parents or Gals……contact me for details as we are gearing up our tour to bring personal safety training (6 hours on one weekend day) to communities everywhere!  Organizers of training’s will train for FREE!

Take care and STAY SAFE!

Raymond Clark Pleads Guilty to Murder of Yale Grad Student Annie Le

March 18, 2011 1 comment

Under Plea Deal, Lab Worker Will Get 44-Year Prison Sentence

Yesterday morning in a Connecticut courtroom, with his entire family looking on, Raymond Clark III pled guilty to the murder and sexual assault of Yale University graduate student Annie Le.

Clark, 26, had been accused of strangling the 24-year-old Le just days before her wedding in September of 2009.

Clark entered the plea under an agreement with prosecutors and will receive a sentence of 44 years. He had been charged with murder and felony murder, each carrying a possible sentence of 25 to 60 years.

*Warning*: the following details are extremely difficult to read.

The details about Le’s murder that were revealed today included the following:

  • Le’s body was found upside-down stuffed in a wall in a research lab wall, her bra pulled up to her neck and her underwear down on September 13, 2009.
  • Her jaw and collarbone were broken and her back bruised in the brutal sexual assault that occurred while she was still alive.
  • There was a violent struggle that left the room splattered with blood and Clark’s face scratched.
  • Clark then strangled her to death.

Five days after she had last been seen inside the Yale medical building. Clark, an animal research assistant who worked in the same facility, was arrested by police Sept. 17 and charged with the murder. When he initially met with investigators, Clark had scratches on his face and left arm — marks that he claimed came from a cat. But in court, prosecutors cited voluminous amounts of evidence from the crime scene that tied Clark to the murder. This included a bloody sock found in the wall that contained both Clark and Le’s DNA as well as a lab coat in the laundry bin that also contained both their DNA. A green ink pen was found under Le’s body that had her blood and Clark’s DNA.

Police said that Clark signed into the secure building using a green pen the day Le went missing. Video footage taken from the building showed that Clark changed his clothes on the day the murder was alleged to have taken place.

Outside the courtroom today, Clark’s father Raymond Clark Jr., said, “It is a heavy heart that I stand here before you today. We will live out our life knowing that he is behind bars. But we are proud of Ray for taking responsibility for his actions and pleading guilty. I want you to know that Ray has expressed extreme remorse from the very beginning. I can’t tell you how many times he sobbed uncontrollably, telling me how sorry he is; telling me how his heart is tortured by the reality the he caused the death of Annie.”

Joe Tacopino, an attorney for Annie Le’s family, said her mother did not attend the hearing today because it would be too painful but that the Le family is satisfied.

After hearing the news of Clark’s plea, a Yale University spokesman, Michael Morand released this statement: “We think first of Annie Le’s family, her fiancé and his family and her friends. We are relieved they have been spared the further agony a long and difficult trial might have caused. We hope today’s guilty plea and the sentence that will follow will help bring closure to them and to all in the Yale community who suffered by her senseless killing.

“All of us are indebted to the men and women of the State’s Attorney, FBI, Connecticut State Police, New Haven Police, Yale Police and the Yale Security who worked swiftly and persistently to investigate the and prosecute this despicable crime. As the criminal proceedings come to a close, we renew our commitment to honor the memory of Annie Le, whose joy of life and learning is an inspiration to faculty, students and staff at Yale now and for the future.”

Partial Contributor ABC News

Anny’s Rant:


YOUR Safety on Your College Campus…

August 13, 2010 Comments off

YOUR Safety on Your College Campus...

With recent murders and assaults on campus grounds and off campus, it’s an excellent time to remind college students the important of safety and awareness.  I cannot drill this into the minds of our female students as well as their parents to keep pressing safety tips.

  1. ALWAYS be aware of your surroundings.  If something seems suspicious or you feel uneasy, notify campus police and/or the city/town police departments right away.  DO NOT WAIT!  TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS!
  2. Keep your dorm/apartment room door locked at ALL times (even when you are in the room or just run down the hall to another room or to the restroom/shower).  DO NOT LOAN YOUR KEYS TO ANYONE, NOT EVEN FRIENDS!
  3. Keep the phone numbers for campus safety/campus security/campus police in your cell phone so that you always have them on hand in case of emergency.  Always carry your cell phone in a holder on the waistline of your pants/shorts.  Always have it on your “person”; never in the bottom of your bookbag or purse.
  4. Don’t walk anywhere around campus alone at night.  Walk with a friend, or call campus security for an escort.  There is nothing wrong with the good ole Buddy system.
  5. Check underneath your car and in the backseat of your car before approaching your car in a parking lot/deck.
  6. Use the remote alarm for your car that will go off when pressed to draw attention to your situation if needed.  Do not hesitate for one second.
  7. When you go out, let someone know where you are going and when you plan to return.  Let this person know of your route and it wouldn’t hurt to call her to let her know that you arrived safely and call when you are on your way back.  God forbid something would happen, she would have pertinent information to give to the police and they could act quickly if you are missing.
  8. Do not give out too much personal information on social networking sites (ie. Facebook).  Often people are giving out way too much information about where they can find them, essentially giving them a road map.
  9. Do not accept drinks from strangers and be careful about drinking too much when out as well.  Use your common sense – you don’t have to “keep up” with anyone and your safety is the most important thing to you.

Take care and STAY SAFE!

Campus Safety…You Can Never Get Enough Information

August 12, 2010 Comments off

Campus Safety…You Can Never Get Enough Information

During college tour guides are probably not your best source of information; they do not usually have extensive statistics or information on campus safety. I suggest approaching students you see on the college campus who are involved in their normal routine and asking them about their perceptions of campus safety. While it is important to keep in mind that this type of unscientific “man on the street” survey should not be taken too seriously, students might provide some insight you can use. If you do this at all of the campuses you visit, you can compare the answers and get a general idea about how comfortable students are.

Also, as a parent on a tour with my son or daughter, I would stop by the campus public safety office and the city/town police department and chat with the employees and Chief of Police there. Of course, they will be putting their best foot forward, but it can be enlightening when you compare the departments at different campuses that you visit.

Now since at this time the majority of students are going through freshmen orientation with and without parents present so I strongly encourage both the parent and student to do the above and check out below for valuable information if you didn’t during your tour of campus.  Even if you are a returning student……READ AND BECOME EDUCATED ABOUT YOUR SAFETY, IT’S YOUR RIGHT!

What should parents/guardians and students look for on campuses and in the student housing to ensure safety?

One key item to look for in residence halls is the access control system. That is, how are residents differentiated from non-residents when entering the buildings? Other things to look for: evidence that external doors are frequently propped open, sufficient lighting in and around the main entrance, and shrubbery and trees pruned back from first- and second-floor windows. And, request that you have the keyed entry lock to your room “re-keyed” even if it cost you $25….split it with your roommate(s) for peace of mind.  You may wish to inquire about the installation of a “keyless” deadbolt as well to give all of you more safety security.

What crime statistics should parents and students request from a school before arriving on campus?

Requesting information from the college is one way to do it. The college is legally mandated to provide that information. I also suggest parents and students do their own research. The Department of Education compiles and makes available campus safety statistics by reporting criminal offenses for over 6,000 colleges and universities in the United States at the following Web site: http://ope.ed.gov/security/.

Again, it is important to keep in mind that oftentimes these types of comparisons are not apples to apples, especially when you look at data from a large urban campus with a high percentage of commuter students and compare it to campus safety data from a suburban or rural campus with a large base of resident students.

Another caveat is that a campus safety department that is doing a good job cracking down on crime on campus will report more crimes than a department that is asleep at the switch and reporting fewer crimes. Even though there are more crimes reported at the first campus, I would argue that the proactive campus safety department makes the first campus safer than the second one does.

Any student assaulted on campus must follow policy and procedures; however, ALWAYS PRESS CHARGES as well as filing a police report at the city/town police department.  Never take no for answer – it is their duty to file your report and to press charges if applicable.

What preventative measures work best for students to stay safe on their college campus?

It is important to remember that colleges and universities are generally safe places. An 18- to 22-year-old is safer, statistically, on their college campus than they are off campus. Because campuses are safer, it can lead to students often letting down their guard. Therefore, the bottom line is that there is no substitute for personal vigilance when it comes to campus safety.

Personal vigilance = being prepared mentally, emotionally and physically.  Learn how you can be your own best bodyguard.

Scheduling fall tour trainings now – get your campus, dorm, Sorority and friends on the “Safety List”.

Take care and STAY SAFE!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 73 other followers